Northwest Arkansas Clinical Trials Center has been a dedicated dermatology research center for more than 7 years. The research center is located in the heart of Northwest Arkansas, home to a regional population of more than 500,000 residents and two large college campuses. The clinical trials center has over 1500 square feet solely dedicated to dermatology research and research subjects. The center includes a reception area, examination rooms, laboratory, locked and temperature monitored investigational product ambient storage, study coordinator offices, and temperature monitored refrigerator and -20 C freezer. All equipment undergoes certification annually.

The combined clinical trial team experience in phase I-phase IV studies exceeds 50 years. Investigational product formulation experience includes oral, intravenous, topical and other parenteral routes. All personnel have certified GCP training and most are IATA certified. The staff is very familiar with the variety of electronic data capture (EDC) platforms and are very proficient in data entry.

The center and personnel have clinical trial experience in the following dermatologic conditions in pediatric, adolescent and adult populations:

  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Alopecia
  • Hyperhidrosis
  • Psoriasis
  • Acne
  • Common Warts
  • Seborrheic Keratosis
  • Rosacea
  • Hidradenitis suppurativa
  head-lice-landing.jpg
Head lice: This magnified picture of head lice on a fine-tooth comb shows that these bugs are tiny.

Head lice: Overview

Also called Pediculus humanus capitis

Having head lice does not mean you are dirty. Most people get head lice when they have head-to-head contact with someone who has head lice. Head-to-head contact lets the lice crawl from one head to another head. The lice do not care whether the person has squeaky-clean hair or dirty hair. The lice are looking for human blood, which they need to survive.

Millions of people get head lice each year. Head-lice infestations are especially common in schools. In the United States, it is believed that about 6 to 12 million children between 3 and 12 years of age get head lice each year.

Head lice are not known to spread disease, but having head lice can make your scalp extremely itchy. If you scratch a lot, it can cause sores on the scalp that may lead to an infection. Some people lose sleep because the itch is so intense.

Treatment, which most people can do at home, usually gets rid of head lice. If you have trouble getting rid of the lice or have an infection from scratching, you should see a dermatologist.

 


References:
Burkhart CN, Burkhart CG. “Fomite transmission in head lice.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2007; 56(6):1044-1047.
Canyon, DV, Speare R, et al. “Spatial and kinetic factors for the transfer of head lice (Pediculus capitis) between hairs.” J Invest Dermatol 2002; 119(3):629-631.
Frankowski BL, Bocchini JA. “Head Lice.” Pediatrics. 2010; 126(2):392-403.
Jacobson CC, Abel EA. “Parasitic infestations.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2007; 56(6):1026-1043.
Ko CJ, Elston DM. “Pediculosis.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2004; 50(1):1-12.


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Northwest AR Clinical Trials Center, PLLC

(479) 876-8049
500 S 52nd St Rogers, AR 72758-8600