Northwest Arkansas Clinical Trials Center has been a dedicated dermatology research center for more than 7 years. The research center is located in the heart of Northwest Arkansas, home to a regional population of more than 500,000 residents and two large college campuses. The clinical trials center has over 1500 square feet solely dedicated to dermatology research and research subjects. The center includes a reception area, examination rooms, laboratory, locked and temperature monitored investigational product ambient storage, study coordinator offices, and temperature monitored refrigerator and -20 C freezer. All equipment undergoes certification annually.

The combined clinical trial team experience in phase I-phase IV studies exceeds 50 years. Investigational product formulation experience includes oral, intravenous, topical and other parenteral routes. All personnel have certified GCP training and most are IATA certified. The staff is very familiar with the variety of electronic data capture (EDC) platforms and are very proficient in data entry.

The center and personnel have clinical trial experience in the following dermatologic conditions in pediatric, adolescent and adult populations:

  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Alopecia
  • Hyperhidrosis
  • Psoriasis
  • Acne
  • Common Warts
  • Seborrheic Keratosis
  • Rosacea
  • Hidradenitis suppurativa


Eczema is a common skin condition in children, which begins with very itchy skin. Scratching can cause a rash that can become infected. If your child’s eczema is frequently infected, your child’s dermatologist may recommend bleach bath therapy.

Bleach baths can be helpful for many children who have moderate to severe eczema. If your child’s dermatologist recommends bleach baths, be sure to ask how much bleach to add to the water and how often a bleach bath should be given. Adding the wrong amount or type of bleach to the bath can irritate your child’s already sensitive skin.

Dermatologists share these important steps for giving a bleach bath:

  1. Use regular strength — 6 percent — bleach for the bath. Do not use concentrated bleach.
  2. Measure the amount of bleach before adding it to the bath water. Use a measuring cup or measuring spoon to add the bleach to the bath. For a full bathtub of water, use a half cup of bleach. For a half-full tub of water, add a quarter cup of bleach. For a baby or toddler bathtub, add one teaspoon of bleach per gallon of water. 
  3. While the tub is filling, pour the bleach into the water. Adding too much bleach to the bath can irritate your children’s skin. Adding too little bleach may not help.
  4. Never apply bleach directly to your child’s eczema. 
  5. Be sure to wait until the bath is fully drawn and bleach is poured before your child enters the tub. 
  6. Talk with your dermatologist about how long your child should soak in the tub. Most dermatologists recommend a five to 10 minute soak. 
  7. Pat your child’s skin dry after the bath. Use white towels if you are concerned about bleach stains.
  8. If your child uses eczema medication, apply it immediately after the bath. Then moisturize your child’s skin. 

It’s very important for parents to talk with their board-certified dermatologist before beginning bleach bath therapy with their child. Bleach bath therapy can be a key component, along with overall good skin care, to gain control of your child’s eczema.

© American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. Use of these materials is subject to the legal notice and terms of use located at https://www.aad.org/about/legal


Contact Us

Northwest AR Clinical Trials Center, PLLC

(479) 876-8205
500 S 52nd St Rogers, AR 72758-8600